Postpartum Depression Hernando MS

There are different treatment options available in Hernando, depending on which subcategory of postpartum depression you have. The baby blues generally go away on their own. In the meantime, you can treat yourself by getting plenty of rest, accepting help when offered and asking for help when needed, connecting with other new moms, and talking to your doctor.

Ms. Katheryn O Teague
(662) 788-1951
DeSoto Family Counseling885 Ferncliff Drive
Southaven, MS
Specialties
Depression, Trauma and PTSD, Sexual Abuse, Bipolar Disorder
Qualification
School: University Of Tennessee
Year of Graduation: 2005
Years In Practice: 2 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Toddlers / Preschoolers (0 to 6),Children (6 to 10),Preteens / Tweens (11 to 13),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$130 - $180
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: BlueCross and/or BlueShield

Ms. Jessica Stockman
(801) 872-9365
7075 Golden Oaks Loop Drive W
Southaven, MS
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Depression, Marital/Communication Difficulties, Elderly Persons Disorders
Qualification
School: University of Louisiana at Monroe
Year of Graduation: 2003
Years In Practice: 7 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Female
Age: Adolescents,Adults
Average Cost
$90 - $130
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes

Natalie White Gaughf
(601) 815-4233
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Jackson, MS
Services
Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Career Assessment and Counseling, Psychoeducational Evaluation
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Southern Mississippi
Credentialed Since: 2006-05-05

Data Provided by:
Molly Clark
(601) 984-5425
2500 N State Street
Jackson, MS
Services
Behavioral Health Intervention involving Life Threatening/Terminal Disease, Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Behavioral Health Intervention involving Primary Care, Individual Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Southern Mississippi
Credentialed Since: 2010-04-14

Data Provided by:
John A. Stoudenmire
(228) 769-2311
4211 Hospital St
Pascagoula, MS
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Disorder Diagnosed in Infancy-Adolescence (e.g., ADHD, LD, MR, or Pervasive Devel Disorder), Psychological Assessment
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Southern Mississippi
Credentialed Since: 1975-02-28

Data Provided by:
Esra Ahmed
Southaven, MS
Specialties
Depression, Relationship Issues, Trauma and PTSD
Qualification
School: University of Memphis
Year of Graduation: 1994
Years In Practice: 10 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any, Asian
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$100 - $130
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Matthew Campbell
2005 Harris Drive
Oxford, MS
Services
Psychological Assessment, Psychoeducational Evaluation, Individual Psychotherapy, Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Mississippi
Credentialed Since: 2004-11-11

Data Provided by:
Linda J. Baker
(601) 856-9100
136 Sherbourne Drive
Madison, MS
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Personality Disorder (e.g., borderline, antisocial)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Mississippi
Credentialed Since: 1979-07-23

Data Provided by:
Rachell N. Anderson
(662) 363-2791
Retired
Tunica, MS
Services
Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Family Psychotherapy, Individual Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Couples Psychotherapy
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Adler School of Professional Psychology
Credentialed Since: 2005-09-19

Data Provided by:
C. Gerald O'Brien
(601) 664-6730
640 Lakeland East Dr
Jackson, MS
Services
Forensic Evaluation (e.g., mental competency evaluation), Personality Disorder (e.g., borderline, antisocial), Stress Management or Pain Management, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Louisville
Credentialed Since: 1999-04-20

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Postpartum Depression

provided by: 

Postpartum Depression

The baby has arrived and everyone is thrilled except you. Its not uncommon for new moms to feel a range of emotions love, happiness, joy, anxiety, fear and sometimes depression. If youre feeling depressed, irritable, sad, angry, stressed or worried, know that you are not alone and that there is something that can be done about it.

The American Pregnancy Association divides postpartum mood disorders into three subcategories: 

  • Baby blues
  • postpartum depression
  • Postpartum psychosis

Each of these has a variety of symptoms and vary in severity and intensity. Following is a breakdown of the three and more information on PPD.

Baby Blues

The baby blues are the mildest form of postpartum depression, and occur suddenly four to five days after the birth of the baby. Symptoms include crying for no reason, impatience, anxiety and irritability.

Postpartum Depression

The American Pregnancy Association estimates that 10% of new mothers experience what is classified as postpartum depression (PPD). Symptoms can begin as soon as a few days after delivering to up to a year after giving birth. Women suffering from PPD will have good days and bad days, but generally will experience fatigue, sadness, decreased appetite, trouble sleeping, and feelings of guilt.

Postpartum Psychosis

Postpartum psychosis (PPP) is the most severe and most rare form of postpartum depression. It occurs in about 1 out of every 1,000 pregnancies, and symptoms usually appear 2-3 weeks after giving birth. Signs of PPP include bizarre behavior, hallucinations, suicidal thoughts and delusion. It is considered a medical emergency and should be treated immediately.

Causes of Postpartum Depression

While there is no single cause of postpartum depression, physical changes, emotional factors and lifestyle influences can all contribute.

Physical changes
After a woman gives birth, estrogen and progesterone levels plummet, which may contribute to postpartum depression. The hormones produced by the thyroid also may drop sharply which can leave you feeling sluggish and depressed. Changes in blood volume and pressure, in your immune system, and your metabolism can also cause feelings of fatigue and mood swings.

Emotional factors
New parents are perpetually sleep deprived and can feel overwhelmed, which can lead to trouble handling even minor issues. In addition, you may feel nervous about your ability to care for a newborn baby and struggle with your sense of identity. These factors can each contribute to postpartum depression.

Lifestyle influences
A demanding or fussy baby or older siblings, trouble breastfeeding, financial worries, exhaustion and feeling overwhelmed or unsupported can all lead to postpartum depression.

Risk Factors for Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression can develop after the birth of any child, not just the first. The risk increases if:

  • You have a history of depression, either during pregnancy or at other times in your life.
  • Youve had postpartum depression after a previous pregnancy.
  • Stressful events have occurred during the past year, such as illness, job loss or pregnancy complications
  • Youre experiencing marital conflict
  • You do not have a strong support system
  • The pregnancy is unplanned or unwanted

Getting Help

There are different treatment options available, depending on which subcategory of postpartum depression you have. The baby blues generally go away on their own. In the meantime, you can treat yourself by getting plenty of rest, accepting help when offered and asking for help when needed, connecting with other new moms, and talking to your doctor.

Postpartum depression is often treated with counseling and medication. Talk to your doctor at your next appointment, or make a special appointment to talk, and to go over your treatment options. Postpartum depression usually goes away within a few months; however, in some cases, it can last for up to a year and sometimes not show up until a few months after giving birth. Its important to continue your treatment even once you are feeling better; stopping too early may lead to a relapse.

Postpartum psychosis is considered a medical emergency and should be treated immediately, usually in a hospital. A combination of medications may be used to treat postpartum psychosis.

A variety of resources and support groups are available for those suffering from PPD. Talk to your doctor or hospital, friends and family. Resources are also available online including Baby Corner's Postpartum Depression Message Board.

Read More About Postpartum Depression

Depression: Not Your Ordinary Blues
Postpartum - The Whole Truth
Post Adoption Blues?
Postpartum Depression Message Board

Author: Teresa Shaw

Click here to read rest of the article

© 1996-2010

Contemporary Media
460 Tennessee Street, 2nd Floor | Memphis, TN 38103
Visit our other sites: Memphis Magazine | Memphis Parent | Memphis Business Quarterly
Powered by Foundation