Mammograms and Breast Cancer Risk West Memphis AR

Mammograms may actually boost the risk of breast cancer in some high-risk women, a new study suggests. Dutch researchers analyzed six previously published studies, four examining the effect of low-dose radiation exposure from mammography among women with the genetic mutation boosting breast cancer risk and two looking at the effect of radiation from screening in women with a family history of breast cancer.

Park Avenue Diagnostic Center
(901) 767-1015
5190 Park Avenue
Memphis, TN
 
Traylor Chiropractic Clinic
(870) 732-6494
500 Missouri St.
West Memphis, AR

Data Provided by:
East Memphis Chiropractic
(901) 202-9216
4954 William Arnold Rd
Memphis, TN

Data Provided by:
Steven T Martin, MD
(901) 371-9040
4901 Raleigh Common Dr
Memphis, TN
Business
Cardiovascular Physicians of Memphis
Specialties
Cardiology

Data Provided by:
Jones Eye Care
(901) 754-2020
2075 Exeter Rd
Germantown, TN

Data Provided by:
Majewski Chiropractic Clinic
(870) 576-9929
200 S Rhodes St # E
West Memphis, AR

Data Provided by:
HealthSource of Southaven
(901) 409-3896
5740 Getwell Road
Southaven, MS

Data Provided by:
Nabeel Kahn, MD
(662) 280-8222
9140 Hwy 51 N
Southaven, MS
Business
Delta Gastroenterology & Endoscopy Center PC
Specialties
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Robert Wallace
(901) 347-8290
7945 Wolf River Blvd
Germantown, TN
Specialties
Cosmetic Surgery
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Neumon Goshorn
(901) 756-3838
7705 Poplar Avenue
Germantown, TN
Specialties
Cosmetic Surgery
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Mammograms and Breast Cancer Risk

Provided By:

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Mammograms may actually boost the risk of breast cancer in some high-risk women, a new study suggests.

Dutch researchers analyzed six previously published studies, four examining the effect of low-dose radiation exposure from mammography among women with the genetic mutation boosting breast cancer risk and two looking at the effect of radiation from screening in women with a family history of breast cancer.

"Women who were exposed before the age of 20 had a 2.5 times increased risk of breast cancer," said Martine Jansen-van der Weide, an epidemiologist and researcher at the University Medical Center Groningen, in the Netherlands. So did women with five or more exposures.

She was to present the findings Monday at the Radiological Society of North America's annual meeting in Chicago.

No information was available from the studies about the time period, said Jansen-van der Weide. The studies did control for different factors that affect breast cancer risk, such as age, breast-feeding and age at first menstruation.

These new findings come in the wake of a controversial recommendation made in mid-November by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for the general public, that women delay routine screening mammograms from age 40 to 50, asking their doctor the best time to begin, and that older women switch to every-other-year mammograms.

Currently, the American Cancer Society and other organizations advise yearly mammograms for women beginning at age 40. For high-risk women, the ACS recommends a mammogram and MRI every year.

Overall, the Dutch researchers also found, the average risk of breast cancer from radiation exposure was 1.5 times greater among the high-risk women studied than the high-risk women not exposed.

The study is important, as it provides the ''first direct piece of evidence on whether high-risk women have an increased risk due to radiation exposure," said Edward Hendrick, a member of the American College of Radiology Commission, a medical physicist and clinical professor at the University of Colorado at Denver.

In the United States, women under 30 don't routinely get mammograms, however, he said. It's known that young women are more radiation-sensitive.

Young women who are deemed high-risk can, if they choose, turn to an MRI breast exam instead, he said. MRIs use magnetic or radio waves, not radiation.

"Screening is very important," Jansen-van der Weide said. "However, for young, high-risk women, a careful approach is advised when considering mammography for screening."

More information

To learn more about guidelines for early detection of cancer, visit the American Cancer Society.

Author: By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

SOURCES: Martine C. Jansen-van der Weide, Ph.D., epidemiologist, University Medical Center Groningen, Netherlands; Edward Hendrick, Ph.D., member, American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Commission, and clinical professor, University of Colorado at Denver; Nov. 30, 2009, presentation, Radiological Society of North America annual meeting, Chicago

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com

© 1996-2010

Contemporary Media
460 Tennessee Street, 2nd Floor | Memphis, TN 38103
Visit our other sites: Memphis Magazine | Memphis Parent | Memphis Business Quarterly
Powered by Foundation